Teacher Mindset Reminders

by | Nov 20, 2018

Teacher Mindset Reminders – An overview

From my experience of working with schools on embedding ways of thinking that support the growth of each child, it has become clear that simple weekly messages for all staff to focus on have proved to be beneficial. This led me to the idea of creating “Teacher Mindset Reminders”. These are easily digestible messages that teachers can remind themselves of during lessons.

A clear focus on one of the “Teacher Mindset Reminders” for one week will enable this message to become embedded in the teacher’s subconscious mind. Over the course of one year, and with over 30 “Teacher Mindset Reminders” now part of the subconscious of each teacher, this will result in a tremendously positive impact in the school.

 

Struggle is good

“The surest path to high self-esteem is to be successful at something one perceived would be difficult! Each time we steal a student’s struggle, we steal the opportunity for them to build self-confidence. They must learn to do difficult things to feel good about themselves.”

Dr. Sylvia Rimm

Tell yourself and the students that:

  1. Struggle is good
  2. Struggle builds self-confidence
  3. Tell them about ways that you struggled and eventually succeeded

 

Good praise

Simple rules about praise you offer will help students a great deal. These are:

  1. Be specific
  2. Be sincere
  3. Praise the process not the person. (That is, praise strategies, decisions, work accomplished.)

Try this out for a week in your classroom and see what differences you observe in yourself and the students.

Remember to only focus on one “Teacher Mindset Reminder” in one week. This way, after a week of constant conscious practice, it will become embedded in the subconscious.

Tony Swainston Tony Swainston is a UK born and based trainer and writer. Following on from a 20-year career in teaching, for the past 15 years he has delivered training, in both business and education, in over 15 countries around the world. Tony has a passion for developing individuals as leaders and coaches, working with people across a broad range of levels in organisations. Read more articles by Tony Swainston

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